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Inspiring Success on the Road to Recovery

Sunday, July 30, 2017

The Business of Recovery Treatment

by Barbara Nicholson Brown





For the unsavory, the business of recovery treatment and sober living is just that — business. Yet on the other side of the coin there are so many professionals in this field whose only goal is to help people, not hurt them, heal, not hinder, and why I’m honored to call them my colleagues and friends.

Recovery treatment has a shadow that is being uncovered and why I asked Jim Kreitler, CEO of Calvary Healing Centers to explain this growing problem, and steps being taken to expose those in this field for the wrong reason. People are dying because of it.

In January of this year addiction treatment, Interventionist Heather Hayes told 3TV, ‘patient brokering is equivalent to human trafficking.’

In our November 2016 issue, Interventionist, Carey Davidson’s article, Navigating the Maze of Addiction Treatment said, “If a person who is recommending a treatment center can’t give clear criteria as to why they are recommending a particular center, find out more. Ask if anyone receives any kind of financial compensation or incentives for referrals and/or placement. Just because someone calls themselves a “professional addiction whatever,” does not mean their decisions are not financially incentivized.” (www.togetheraz.com/previous issues November 2016). In short, Beware.
Treatment industry insiders in Phoenix say the city became flooded with body brokering because it’s unregulated and remains legal. State Representative Noel Campbell entered a bill into the state health committee, which would make patient brokering and kick-backs illegal. Without patient care in mind, without the person’s health, well-being, and safety coming first, there is no room for success for anyone seeking help.

Don’t let the unethical practice of patient brokering ruin your view of addiction treatment or rehab facilities. There are hundreds of high quality treatment facilities all around the country, and many recognizable names in our state committed to getting addicts and alcoholics the professional help they need.

I invite you to learn more about Ethics and Treatment in Arizona at the Art of Recovery Expo this September. Jim Kreitler and a panel of professionals will discuss these challenges and more at 10:30 a.m. Bring your questions and become informed with the tools necessary to make the right choice. (see  page 9)